Confucian Dream

(Confucian Dream)

In the reality of rapidly changing China, more and more people are resorting to the ancient teachings of Confucianism. One of them is Chaoyan, who hopes the ancient ways will help improve her family life and ensure a better future for her young son.

Young mother Chaoyan comes from a village and feels lost in the big city. When she finds Confucianism, she feels as if she has finally found herself. Through this thousand-year-old teaching she wants to break free from the superficiality of modern society, and she would like to do the same for her four-year-old son Chen. She would like to enrol him in a private Confucian school, but her husband Mei disagrees. Although Confucianism is supposed to bring about harmony, peace and order, in fact the opposite happens, and a long-repressed dispute over the boy's education and the spouses' common future is ignited. Director Mijie Li sensitively portrays a family crisis in contemporary China, attempting to find a balance between the drive for total performance and the desire for a spiritual revival.

About the film

Director: Mijie Li
China, USA
2019 | 82 min.

Language: Mandarin (Chinese)

Subtitles: English

Director

Mijie Li

Filmography
2019 - Confucian Dream
2019 - Hollywood Bob

Mijie Li

Screenings

Others Films from category China: Powerful and Powerless

A Tunnel

A Tunnel

The Chinese project One Belt, One Road (a modern Silk Road) has reached even a remote Georgian village. What does it bring the locals in addition to the promised prosperity and a better standard of living?

Confucian Dream

Confucian Dream

In the reality of rapidly changing China, more and more people are resorting to the ancient teachings of Confucianism. One of them is Chaoyan, who hopes the ancient ways will help improve her family life and ensure a better future for her young son.

China

China's Artful Dissident

An anonymous Chinese artist is fighting against a totalitarian state that has already caught up with many of his colleagues. What can one person do against a seemingly omnipotent regime?

Leftover Women

Leftover Women

Unmarried Chinese women of around 30 are labelled shengnu – leftover. Until they find a husband they face both the open contempt of the Chinese government and the stifling judgement of society and even their closest relatives.

Ximei

Ximei

She herself is fighting an incurable disease, but has enough strength to help others. In China, which boasts economic success, but ostracises those with AIDS.